Pregnant Sri Lankan Woman Waiting In Queue For Two Days For Passport Delivers Baby Girl – Sri Lanka Crisis

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A pregnant woman, who had been in line for two days to get a passport to leave beleaguered Sri Lanka for overseas employment, started labor pains there. Waiting for her turn on Thursday, the woman started labor pains after which she was immediately taken to the hospital where she gave birth to a baby girl. Sri Lankan Army personnel posted at the Department of Immigration and Emigration in Colombo noticed a 26-year-old woman in labor on the premises on Thursday morning and was taken to Castle Hospital, where she gave birth, officials said. A woman from Central Hills along with her husband had been in a queue for the last two days to get a passport to work abroad.

Long queue at passport office
The economic crisis started in Sri Lanka in late January and due to this there are long queues for passports at the passport office. Most of the people have opted for the one day passport service. Meanwhile, another person waiting in the fuel queue died of a heart attack this morning. This is the fifteenth such death of a person in a fuel queue since March. The 60-year-old ice cream vendor, riding a three-wheeler, had spent two consecutive days in a queue for fuel at Payagala in the south. While standing in the queue, he experienced chest pain after which he was taken to the hospital where he was declared brought dead. Long queues for fuel are now visible at Indian Oil Company’s LIOC retail pumps.

State fuel unit CPC pumps have dried up 10 days ago with no information about the arrival of supply ships in the country. LIOC operates over 200 pumping stations in Sri Lanka, now supplying it from its storage tanks in the eastern district of Trincomalee. Energy Minister Kanchana Wijesekara told Parliament on Wednesday that no fuel-carrying vessel was available as of 22 July until a ship arrived from the IOC. So to make up for the shortfall, the government opted to pay a higher price and ordered a shipment that could arrive by July 15.

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A pregnant woman, who had been in line for two days to get a passport to leave beleaguered Sri Lanka for overseas employment, started labor pains there. Waiting for her turn on Thursday, the woman started labor pains after which she was immediately taken to the hospital where she gave birth to a baby girl. Sri Lankan Army personnel posted at the Department of Immigration and Emigration in Colombo noticed a 26-year-old woman in labor on the premises on Thursday morning and was taken to Castle Hospital, where she gave birth, officials said. A woman from Central Hills along with her husband had been in a queue for the last two days to get a passport to work abroad.

Long queue at passport office

The economic crisis started in Sri Lanka in late January and due to this there are long queues for passports at the passport office. Most of the people have opted for the one day passport service. Meanwhile, another person waiting in the fuel queue died of a heart attack this morning. This is the fifteenth such death of a person in a fuel queue since March. The 60-year-old ice cream vendor, riding a three-wheeler, had spent two consecutive days in a queue for fuel at Payagala in the south. While standing in the queue, he experienced chest pain after which he was taken to the hospital where he was declared brought dead. Long queues for fuel are now visible at Indian Oil Company’s LIOC retail pumps.

State fuel unit CPC pumps have dried up 10 days ago with no information about the arrival of supply ships in the country. LIOC operates over 200 pumping stations in Sri Lanka, now supplying it from its storage tanks in the eastern district of Trincomalee. Energy Minister Kanchana Wijesekara told Parliament on Wednesday that no fuel-carrying vessel was available as of 22 July until a ship arrived from the IOC. So to make up for the shortfall, the government opted to pay a higher price and ordered a shipment that could arrive by July 15.

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