Space Tourism Ready To Fly In The City Of The Moon, Exercise Intensified For The Country’s First Dark Sky Reserve – Space Tourism

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Apart from the artificial planetarium, now tourists will be able to see the wonderful view of the whole universe from the Himalayas. Scientists are studying at Hanle, one of the world’s highest astronomical observatories, located at an altitude of 14,800 feet above sea level in Ladakh. Tourists will also be exposed to the mysterious world of space due to the formation of a thousand square kilometer dark sky reserve around the observatory.

A short film on the country’s first Dark Sky Reserve project in Hanle, Ladakh, called the city of the moon, has been released by the Ladakh administration on Thursday.

Ladakh Administration, Autonomous Hill Development Council Leh and Indian Institute of Astrophysics Bangalore are working together on the Dark Sky Reserve project. Under the project, lighting in the dark of night will be controlled in an area of ​​1000 square kilometers. Strict guidelines will be issued to control the light emanating from the bulbs of homes to flood lights and high beams of vehicles.

Being a high mountain area, studying and observing other astronomical activities including the galaxies on the sky in the dark of night in Hanle is very exciting. Despite the restrictions, the local villagers are enthusiastic about the project. Space tourism will open up employment opportunities for them.

Telescopes will be installed for space tourism
The Hanle Dark Sky Reserve area has a total population of one thousand people. These houses will benefit from this project through space tourism. Telescopes will be provided to the local people, so that the tourists living in the home stay will be able to see the thrill of astronomy activities. For this, initial training of villagers has also started.

We’re excited about Dark Sky Reserve. Sources of income are very difficult to find in remote areas. We will get employment from space tourism. There have been meetings with the administration. The entire village wants the project to be realized soon.
– Paljor Tharchin, Sarpanch Hanle

The Hanle area is in a remote area with no population and no vehicular movement. Due to the absence of light pollution, the dark at night helps in the study of astronomical phenomena. Ladakh is also called the cold desert. There are very few clouds here. These conditions are favorable for Dark Sky Reserve.
– Dorje Angchuk, engineer in charge, Hanley Observatory

The observatory located in South India remains closed from June to September due to monsoon. Study is possible only for eight months in a year. Since Ladakh is far away from the reach of monsoon, it can be studied throughout the year. For this reason, Hanle is best suited for the country’s first dark sky reserve. Efforts are being made in this regard.
-Pro. Annapurni Subramaniam, Director Indian Institute of Astrophysics

Expansion

Apart from the artificial planetarium, now tourists will be able to see the wonderful view of the whole universe from the Himalayas. Scientists are studying at Hanle, one of the world’s highest astronomical observatories, located at an altitude of 14,800 feet above sea level in Ladakh. Tourists will also be exposed to the mysterious world of space due to the formation of a thousand square kilometer dark sky reserve around the observatory.

A short film on the country’s first Dark Sky Reserve project in Hanle, Ladakh, called the city of the moon, has been released by the Ladakh administration on Thursday.

Ladakh Administration, Autonomous Hill Development Council Leh and Indian Institute of Astrophysics Bangalore are working together on the Dark Sky Reserve project. Under the project, lighting in the dark of night will be controlled in an area of ​​1000 square kilometers. Strict guidelines will be issued to control the light emanating from the bulbs of homes to flood lights and high beams of vehicles.

Being a high mountain area, studying and observing other astronomical activities including the galaxies on the sky in the dark of night in Hanle is very exciting. Despite the restrictions, the local villagers are enthusiastic about the project. Space tourism will open up employment opportunities for them.

Telescopes will be installed for space tourism

The Hanle Dark Sky Reserve area has a total population of one thousand people. These houses will benefit from this project through space tourism. Telescopes will be provided to the local people, so that the tourists living in the home stay will be able to see the thrill of astronomy activities. For this, initial training of villagers has also started.

We’re excited about Dark Sky Reserve. Sources of income are very difficult to find in remote areas. We will get employment from space tourism. There have been meetings with the administration. The entire village wants the project to be realized soon.

– Paljor Tharchin, Sarpanch Hanle

The Hanle area is in a remote area with no population and no vehicular movement. Due to the absence of light pollution, the dark at night helps in the study of astronomical phenomena. Ladakh is also called the cold desert. There are very few clouds here. These conditions are favorable for Dark Sky Reserve.

– Dorje Angchuk, engineer in charge, Hanley Observatory

The observatory located in South India remains closed from June to September due to monsoon. Study is possible only for eight months in a year. Since Ladakh is far away from the reach of monsoon, it can be studied throughout the year. For this reason, Hanle is best suited for the country’s first dark sky reserve. Efforts are being made in this regard.

-Pro. Annapurni Subramaniam, Director Indian Institute of Astrophysics

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